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close this section of the library Salili, Diana Hinge


View the PDF document Analysis of existing climate change and disaster risk management policies for Vanuatu and the Solomon Islands. Will their integration efficiently support the adaptation strategies necessary for 2030 and beyond? : perceptions of stakeholders from the Solomon Islands and Vanuatu
Author:Salili, Diana Hinge
Institution: University of the South Pacific.
Award: M.Sc.
Subject: Climatic changes -- Risk management -- Government policy -- Solomon Island, Climatic changes -- Risk management -- Government policy -- Vanuatu
Date: 2016
Call No.: pac QC 903 .2 .S25 2016
BRN: 1208039
Copyright:20-40% of this thesis may be copied without the authors written permission

Abstract: An analysis of existing climate change adaptation (CCA) and disaster risk management (DRM) policies for Solomon Islands and Vanuatu was undertaken to determine whether the integration of climate change and disaster risk management policies in both countries would efficiently support the adaptation strategies necessary for 2030 and beyond. 2030 was chosen for three major reasons. The policies included in this research have a lifetime that coincides with 2030. There is also the issue of the lengthy process and the amount of time it takes to amend and develop new policies in these two countries. Additionally, the scientific projections that have been downscaled and are specific for both countries begin at 2030 so this research will use 2030 as the year of reference. The Solomon Islands has two distinct seasons, a wet season from November to April and a dry season from May to October. Temperatures are relatively constant throughout the year with small changes between seasons. Vanuatu’s current climate includes annual average temperatures of 23.5 – 27.5°C. There are also two distinct seasons: the warm wet season from November to April and the cool dry season from May to October. Scientific projections for the Solomon Islands for 2030 under a high emissions scenario include an increase in temperature between 0.4 and 1.0°C, changes in rainfall patterns to include an increase in wet season rainfall and more extreme rainfall days. Less frequent but more intense tropical cyclones, an increase in sea level of 4 – 15cm and increased ocean acidification are also projected. Scientific projections for Vanuatu for 2030 under a high emissions scenario include an increase in temperature between 0.4 and 1.0°C, changing rainfall patterns to include an increase in wet season rainfall and more extreme rainfall
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