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close this section of the library Air layering -- Fiji


View the PDF document An evaluation of marcotting techniques on breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis) variety, 'bale kana' for improved multiplication of planting materials in Fiji.
Author: Leweniqila, Ilisoni Lasaqa Vuetinabouono
Institution: University of the South Pacific.
Award: M.Agri.
Subject: Breadfruit -- Propagation -- Fiji, Air layering -- Fiji
Date: 2013
Call No.: pac SB 379 .B8 L492 2013
BRN: 1193268
Copyright:20-40% of this thesis may be copied without the authors written permission

Abstract: The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of different ‘techniques’ on the breadfruit variety ‘Bale kana’ to improve marcotting multiplication of planting materials in Fiji. Two trials were established at one trial site because of the young age and small sizes of the mother trees available at the time. The first trial evaluated the effects of four (4) different marcotting media on the onset of first root growth; root mass at harvest; time to harvest of marcotts; and percent success. The marcotting media used were Control Medium (peat moss); Medium 1 (peat moss plus 10% sphagnum moss); Medium 2 (Peat moss with 10% sphagnum moss and liquid rooting hormone); and Medium 3 (peat moss plus 10% sphagnum moss plus powdered hormone) were randomly assigned to the 21 experimental blocks where each available breadfruit mother tree was treated as a block in a Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD). Results showed there was an effect of marcotting media on the onset of the first root growth; root mass at harvest; earliness of harvest; and on the total number of successful marcotts (P<0.05). Results showed that marcotting Medium 2 although not statistically different from the Control Medium provided the highest percentage of root mass at harvest, earliest harvest of marcotts and the highest total number of successful marcotts. This fast root appearance and growth is thought to be due to the medium’s good water holding capacity and the use of liquid rooting hormone which provided ideal conditions for good root growth. Field conditions during the time of the experiment were also favorable with high relative humidity (< 80%) and temperatures 30 – 32oC (Steward, 2012). The second trial aimed to determine the effects of two branch sizes and two branch locations (high and low) on the onset of first root growth; root mass at harvest; time to harvest of marcotts; and percent success. The 4 treatment combinations (size & locations) were randomly allocated to the 21 experimental blocks where each available breadfruit mother tree was treated as a block using a Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD). Results showed that the big branches (3.5 to 4.5 cm in diameter) performed better than small branches (P<0.05). The onset of the first root growth in big branches was 10 days earlier; marcotts from big branches produced 3.2 times more root mass at harvest; and 2.2 times more successful marcotts. However, branch size did not affect time to harvest of marcotts at the 100% root ball stage. There was also no effect due to location of branches on the mother trees. The better performance of big branches is suggested to be due to a higher amount of carbohydrates in the big branches although not measured in this work (Stice, 2013).
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